Frequently Asked questions

The land cover features can be classified using 5 different land cover classes:


  1. Artificial surfaces

  2. Agricultural areas

  3. Forest and semi natural areas

  4. Wetlands

  5. Water bodies


Land cover (LC) is technically the observation of the biophysical cover of the earth surface. The methods of observation can vary from human eye to aerial photographs, satellite sensors or even existing maps. The definition widens from vegetation to man-made features and includes bare rocks, bare soils, and water areas [1].



Land cover data can be stored and retrieved in NELGA LDH in two formats (vector data or  raster data).



[1] Gong X, Marklund LG, Tsuji S. Land Use Classification Proposed to Be Used in the System of Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA). 14thMeeting of the London Group on Environmental Accounting; Canberra 2009.

You can view and download the Land Cover datasets by hovering over the Spatial Data menu, then clicking on the “Land cover” item from the drop down menu as shown in the following figure.


The Land Cover page is divided into 2 sections. 

  1. The first section contains a description about the land cover data that is expected to be stored in the portal.

  2. In the second section, a list of the contributed land cover spatial datasets in NELGA LDH is shown.

  3. The third section is a map that spatially shows the contributed land cover spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

In order to view a specific dataset spatially, all you need to do is to click on the switch button in the last column of the “list of contributions” section where the data where the targeted dataset is listed. Only then, the spatial data of this dataset will be shown in the map in the second section.

In order to hide the spatial data of the dataset that you have recently viewed, you can simply toggle the switch button in the rightmost column by clicking on it.

Cadastral data are the data in which land ownership information is stored [1]. In NELGA LDH, the spatial extent of cadastral data can be stored and retrieved in 2 main spatial categories:



  1. Cadastral Parcels:


Are those areas which are defined by land registration authorities and can be owned or benefited from by individuals, authorities, organizations, etc. [2]. The data of which category can be stored and retrieved in NELGA LDH as vector data according to the following rules.


  1. Land ownership rights and owners are not part of NELGA LDH schema.

  2. Buildings and other land use objects are part of other categories of NELGA LDH.


  1. Cadastral Zones:


It can be described as those administrative areas where cadastral parcels belong to spatially and registered under them [3] [4]. The spatial representations of cadastral zones are being stored and retrieved in NELGA LDH as vector data according to the following rules:


Cadastral zones are following a spatial hierarchy schema that can be defined differently from a country to another by the authorities responsible for the cadastral registration in this country.

You can view and download the cadastral spatial datasets by hovering over the Spatial Data menu, then clicking on the Cadastral map item from the drop down menu as shown in the following figure.


The cadastral map page is divided into 3 sections as shown in the following figure:

  1. The first section contains a description about the cadastral data that is expected to be stored in the portal.

  2. In the second section, a list of the contributed Cadastral spatial datasets in NELGA LDH is shown.

  3. The third section is a map that spatially shows the contributed Cadastral spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

In order to view a specific dataset spatially, all you need to do is to click on the switch button in the last column of the “list of contributions” section where the data where the targeted dataset is listed. Only then, the spatial data of this dataset will be shown in the map in the second section.

In order to hide the spatial data of the dataset that you have recently viewed, you can simply toggle the switch button in the rightmost column by clicking on it.


Mineral tenure is a system to manage the ownership and rights concerning mining activities in a certain piece of land. [1]


[1] https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1330617283096/1547750289680

Mineral tenure data can be classified based on the license type, scale and minerals.

  1. License type

    1. Mining

    2. Exploration

    3. Prospection

    4. Development

    5. Retention

    6. Artisanal

  2. Scale

    1. Small

    2. Medium

    3. Large

  3. Minerals

    1. Iron

    2. Petroleum

    3. Gold

    4. Coal

    5. Copper

    6. Spar

    7. Construction material


According to the previous classification, a mining parcel can be classified as licensed for mining coal in a medium scale or licensed for prospecting for gold in large scale for instance.

You can view and download the Mineral Tenure datasets by hovering over the Spatial Data menu, then clicking on the “Mineral Tenure” item from the drop down menu as shown in the following figure.


The Mineral Tenure page is divided into 2 sections. 

  1. The first section contains a list of the contributed Mineral Tenure spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

  2. The second section is a map that spatially shows the contributed Mineral Tenure spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

In order to view a specific dataset spatially, all you need to do is to click on the switch button in the last column of the “list of contributions” section where the data where the targeted dataset is listed. Only then, the spatial data of this dataset will be shown in the map in the second section.

In order to hide the spatial data of the dataset that you have recently viewed, you can simply toggle the switch button in the rightmost column by clicking on it.

Data are the records of on-going disputes on land properties which have been recorded by judicial authorities of the country, region or by NGOs. Many NGOs obtain and analyze data on land disputes that can be viewed or downloaded over the internet.

You can view and download the Land Conflict datasets by hovering over the Spatial Data menu, then clicking on the “Land Conflict” item from the drop down menu as shown in the following figure.


The Land Conflict page is divided into 2 sections. As Shown in the following figure:

  1. The first section contains a list of the contributed Land Conflict spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

  2. The second section is a map that spatially shows the contributed Land Conflict spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

Inorder to view a specific dataset spatially, all you need to do is to click on the switch button in the last column of the “list of contributions” section where the data where the targeted dataset is listed. Only then, the spatial data of this dataset will be shown in the map in the second section.

Inorder to hide the spatial data of the dataset that you have recently viewed, you can simply toggle the switch button in the rightmost column by clicking on it.

Land tenure is the legal system in which land is owned by an individual, who is said to "hold" the land. It determines who can use land, for how long and under what conditions. Tenure may be based both on official laws and policies, and on informal customs. In other words, the land tenure system implies a system according to which land is held by an individual or the actual tiller of the land. It determines the owners rights and responsibilities in connection with their holding [1].


[1] https://payrollheaven.com/define/land-tenure/

You can view and download the Land Tenure datasets by hovering over the Spatial Data menu, then clicking on the “Land Tenure” item from the drop down menu as shown in the following figure.


The Land Tenure page is divided into 2 sections. As Shown in the following figure:

  1. The first section contains a list of the contributed Land Tenure spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

  2. The second section is a map that spatially shows the contributed Land Tenure spatial datasets in NELGA LDH.

In order to view a specific dataset spatially, all you need to do is to click on the switch button in the last column of the “list of contributions” section where the data where the targeted dataset is listed. Only then, the spatial data of this dataset will be shown in the map in the second section.

In order to hide the spatial data of the dataset that you have recently viewed, you can simply toggle the switch button in the rightmost column by clicking on it.

Land use (LU) is a reflection of the degree of human activities in relation to land and benefiting from its resources or having an influence. Most human activities, such as employment,  recreation or residence are linked to land [1].


Land use data can be stored and retrieved in NELGA LDH in two formats (vector data or raster data).

The land use objects and areas can be classified using 13 different land use classes:

  1. Other uses

  2. Commercial services

  3. Forestry

  4. Agriculture

  5. Utilities

  6. Cultural entertainment and recreational services

  7. Residential use

  8. Energy production

  9. Community services

  10. Transport networks & services

  11. Mining and quarrying

  12. Industry

  13. Aquaculture and fishing

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